Norway

Norway

Faultless

Article 100 of Norway’s 1814 constitution prepared the ground for media freedom. Today, the media are free and journalists are not subject to censorship or political pressure. Violence against journalists and media is rare, although some have been threatened by Islamist fundamentalists in recent years. The Media Ownership Act, an anti-concentration law adopted in 1997, bans leading media groups such as Egmont, Schibsted, and Amedia from owning more than 40% of the shares in any TV station, radio station, or newspaper. State subsidies for the media are indirect for general news print media (which are also VAT exempt) and direct for print media specializing in opinion. In March 2017, a media coalition launched #ETTMINUTT, a project aimed at reminding the public of the importance of media pluralism and independence in the provision of reliable news and information.

1
in the 2017 World Press Freedom Index

Ranking

+2

3 in 2016

Global score

-1.19

8.79 in 2016

  • 0
    journalists killed in 2017
  • 0
    netizens killed in 2017
  • 0
    media assistants killed in 2017
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