COLLATERAL FREEDOM

RSF unblocks 24 censored websites

Starting on World Day Against Cyber-Censorship, Internet users throughout the world will have free and unrestricted access to Ozguruz (Turkish journalist Can Dundar’s website in Turkey), Azathabar (in Turkmenistan), Meydan (Azerbaijan), Doha News (Qatar) and Alqst (Saudi Arabia).


How does RSF outsmart censorship?


Operation #CollateralFreedom circumvents technological censorship by means of an original strategy in which “mirrors” or duplicates of the censored websites are created on the servers of the world’s Internet giants. Authoritarian regimes cannot block access to the mirrors without the “collateral damage” of restricting their own access to the services of these Internet companies.

Help us to outsmart censorship!
RSF has to buy bandwidth to keep its mirror sites accessible. The more they are visited, the faster this bandwidth is used up. By making a donation, every Internet user can help to fund the bandwidth needed to maintain and extend access to the unblocked websites. New: RSF is offering a Google Chrome and Firefox browser extension called “Censorship detector” that facilitates access to websites within the countries where they are censored.

15 countries enemies of Internet

Focus on Censorship

Cuba

In Cuba, Internet access is still restricted because of its prohibitive cost and is still closely controlled. Officials often blame the low Internet penetration on the US embargo but this excuse ceased to be valid after the ALBA-1 fibre-optic cable linking Cuba to Venezuela became operational, leaving a political desire to restrict access as the only possible explanation. Independent Cuban journalists and bloggers are rarely read by their compatriots inside Cuba. Slow Internet connections and the risk of hacking make it difficult for them to update their websites in Internet cafés or hotels. They go to embassies to post their stories on websites based abroad. As a result, they are forced to go embassies to post their stories on websites based abroad. They are constantly spied on by the security agents patrolling the street, who harass them with threats of arrest and delete material found on memory cards and USB sticks.

in the 2016 World Press Freedom Index
Go to the ranking
Unblocked website by RSF