World Press Freedom Day: Rana Ayyub, Edward Snowden and Joseph Stiglitz interviewed exclusively for RSF by Maria Ressa

In the run-up to World Press Freedom Day on 3 May, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is publishing exclusive interviews by Philippine journalist Maria Ressa with Washington Post columnist Rana Ayyub, whistleblower Edward Snowden, Nobel economy laureate Joseph Stiglitz and RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire on the subject of “Journalism in crisis: a decisive decade.”

#RSFTalks with Edward Snowden

Watch his exclusive interview for RSF:

#RSFTalks with Rana Ayyub

Watch her exclusive interview for RSF:

#RSFTalks with Joseph Stiglitz

Watch his exclusive interview for RSF:

#RSFTalks with Christophe Deloire

The #RSFtalks by parts


EDWARD SNOWDEN

Part I: “This is what I tried to do in my work with journalists, it was to maximize the public benefit while mitigating the risks of publishing meaningful information in a free and open society”

Part 2: “ Governments have such an appetite for the capabilities and the information to data that these companies (Google, Appel, Facebook, Yahoo and many more) hold on individuals that governments are beginning to become clients to corporations”




Part 3: “We feel like we know everything, that little Google search box, the accessibility of information allows us to pull up any argument to support our own preexisting cognitive biases but how would that change? I think that is really the heart of journalism”

Part 4: “We feel like we know everything, that little Google search box, the accessibility of information allows us to pull up any argument to support our own preexisting cognitive biases but how would that change? I think that is really the heart of journalism”

Part 5: “We see extraordinarily brave journalists, we see extraordinarily brave people in every occupation today because crisis and tragedy, as terrible as they are, they have a way, I believe, in bringing up the best in individuals but I don’t want people to think, you know, that this is something that happens without sacrifice.”

RANA AYYUB

Part I: “It it ironic that the #WorldPressFreedom #Index was released the same week as some of the bravest journalists in Kashmir have been arrested under terror charges"


Part 2: "I was doxxed, getting hate mails, hate messages on my phone, getting nasty calls from callers every night saying that they would teach me a lesson."

Part 3: "I drive my strength from these journalists who are fighting every day to retain the integrity of this profession."

Part 4: "The fact the international community is watching is in a way a big support (...) for Kashmiri journalists"

JOSEPH STIGLITZ

Part I: “We have created a peculiar Wild West of under-regulated information marketplace – it is not a market, it is a mafia market, money and thuggery.”

Part 2: “I believe that access to accurate news, to information, to knowledge is a fundamental public good and as a public good it has to be publicly supported”

Part 3: “The United States has a leader now who does not understand the roles of checks and balances, separation of powers, independent bureaucracies of judges, the role of an independent media”

Part 4: “I think citizens have to advocate through the political process for regulations”

Part 5: “I believe we have the knowledge to prevent another great depression but I don’t know whether our politics will allow us to do it.”

CHRISTOPHE DELOIRE

Part I: “The 2020 edition of the World Press Freedom Index shows clearly that we are entering a decisive decade for journalism.” 

Part 2: “When we defend press freedom, we do not defend journalists just for themselves, just because we would be a group with internal solidarity. This is not what it is at stake. What is at stake is the right to information.”

Part 3: “We have to set up the rules and, of course, defend all the people who embody our common ideals.”


Part 4: “Algorithms do what, normally, democratic parliaments should do but now they took this power and we, as consumers, we accepted to delegate them the management of this space.”

Part 5: “We have to prove, as journalists, that journalism is composed of rights and duties”