COLLATERAL FREEDOM

RSF unblocks 24 censored websites

Starting on World Day Against Cyber-Censorship, Internet users throughout the world will have free and unrestricted access to Ozguruz (Turkish journalist Can Dundar’s website in Turkey), Azathabar (in Turkmenistan), Meydan (Azerbaijan), Doha News (Qatar) and Alqst (Saudi Arabia).


How does RSF outsmart censorship?


Operation #CollateralFreedom circumvents technological censorship by means of an original strategy in which “mirrors” or duplicates of the censored websites are created on the servers of the world’s Internet giants. Authoritarian regimes cannot block access to the mirrors without the “collateral damage” of restricting their own access to the services of these Internet companies.

Help us to outsmart censorship!
RSF has to buy bandwidth to keep its mirror sites accessible. The more they are visited, the faster this bandwidth is used up. By making a donation, every Internet user can help to fund the bandwidth needed to maintain and extend access to the unblocked websites. New: RSF is offering a Google Chrome and Firefox browser extension called “Censorship detector” that facilitates access to websites within the countries where they are censored.

15 countries enemies of Internet

Focus on Censorship

Saudi Arabia

The Saudi regime cracks down harshly on dissent, often by using the 2007 cyber-crime law. Blasphemy, insulting religion, “inciting chaos,” and defaming the king and the state are all punishable by long jail terms. Online media, the websites of the traditional media and platforms with video or audio content are now required to apply to the ministry of information and culture for a licence. To get a three-year licence, applicants must sign an identity declaration, provide documents “attesting to good behaviour” and provide the website host’s name. Forums, blogs, personal websites, distribution lists, electronic files and chats are all now recorded. As a result of a February 2014 decision, bloggers must now also give their real identity.

168
in the 2017 World Press Freedom Index
Go to the ranking
Unblocked websites by RSF