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July 26, 2019 - Updated on July 29, 2019

Hong Kong: RSF presents five proposals to put an end to violence against the press

PHOTO: ANTHONY WALLACE / AFP
In a letter to Carrie Lam, the Chief Executive of Hong Kong, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) details five proposals to put an end to the violence against journalists and restore full freedom of the press.

Christophe Deloire, Secretary-General of Reporters Without Borders (RSF), has dispatched yesterday a letter to Carrie Lam, the Chief Executive of Hong Kong, in which he details five proposals to end the violence against journalists and restore full freedom of the press in China’s Special Administrative Region.

1/ Unequivocally withdraw the Extradition Bill, which is widely feared to pose a major threat to journalists and their sources in Hong Kong.

2/ Ensure that the law enforcement refrain from any violence or coercion against journalists and protect them anytime their safety is threatened.


3/ Ensure that those who call for, order, perpetrate, or glorify violent acts against journalists are being prosecuted and punished; establish an independent commission to investigate acts of brutality.


4/ Enforce the highest level of transparency on public affairs for the media.


5/ Give clear instructions to all members of the Hong Kong administration to support freedom of the press and facilitate the work of journalists by all means.

During the mass demonstrations over the last two months, police and pro-Beijing demonstrators have attacked journalists on numerous occasions. Violence culminated on July 21st at the Yuen Long MTR station when mobsters viciously attacked civilians, including journalists, while law enforcement looked the other way.

In a report published on July 7th, the Hong Kong Journalists Association (HKJA) deplored “one of the worst years” for journalists since the handover of former British colony to China and denounced “a deliberate policy” to restrict journalistic freedoms.

In the RSF World Press Freedom Index, Hong Kong’s ranking has plummeted from 18th in 2002 to 73rd this year. China itself is ranked 177th out of 180.

The letter was published in the following media:

Read the letter in its entirety: