News

January 16, 2018 - Updated on January 17, 2018

Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2018

16.01.2018 - Telegram accessible again in Iran

The Iranian authorities unblocked access to the encrypted messaging app Telegram on 13 January, two weeks after rendering it inaccessible because its founder, Pavel Durov, refused to shut down all the opposition channels using it during a major wave of anti-government protests. Telegram is very popular in Iran, where it has an estimated 40 million users. By using VPNs, many of them continued to access it during the blocking.


At the same time, the government and above all state radio and TV have tried to promote Iranian apps such as Soroush, a “national” app based on the source code of the French app Linphone that has been approved by the Cyberspace Supreme Council. Created at Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei’s behest in March 2012 to oversee the Internet, this body is headed by senior politicians and military officers.


The government has also unblocked other apps such as Instagram and WeChat, a Chinese social media app that cooperates closely with the Chinese government. Facebook and Twitter continue to be inaccessible in Iran, and the Internet as a whole continues to suffer frequent disruptions.

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10.01.2018 - Four citizen-journalists released

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that four citizen-journalists who work for the pro-Sufi news website Majzooban Nor – Mohammad Sharifi Moghadam, Mohammad Reza Sharifi, Faezeh Abdipour and Kasra Nouri – were released provisionally yesterday after pressure from families, friends and supporters, who staged a sit-in outside Tehran’s Evin prison. The four citizen-journalists had been taken to Evin and Rajai Shahr prisons following their arrests by intelligence ministry agents on 31 December.

The families of hundreds of detainees have been gathering outside prisons throughout Iran, including the notorious Evin, because of concern about the fate of their loved-ones.

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09.01.2018 - Journalists interrogated in several provinces

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) yet again condemns the persecution of journalists in Iran. Many journalists and citizen-journalists have been summoned and questioned by intelligence ministry officials in Tehran and in the provincial cities of Isfahan, Machhad, Kermanshah and Mahabad. Khosro Kurdpour, the editor of the news website Mokeryan, was summoned twice on 31 December and again yesterday and was interrogated for several hours about his site’s coverage of protests in the western province of Kurdistan. Officials told him that the protests were illegal and that it was therefore illegal for the media to cover them. Kurdpour was already jailed for four years in connection with his journalistic activities, from November 2013 to September 2017.


At least 25 people have been killed and more than 3,700 people, including many citizen-journalists, have been arrested in the wave of protests in cities throughout the country that began on 28 December. According to several sources, at least three young protesters were killed while detained in Arak, Dezful and Tehran’s Evin prison. The regime claims that these detainees “committed suicide.”

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2017)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2016)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2015)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time ( January-December 2014)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time ( January-December 2013)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-December 2012)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-December 2011)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (July-December 2010)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-July 2010)

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Press freedom violations recounted in real time (June-December 2009)