COLLATERAL FREEDOM

RSF unblocks 24 censored websites

Starting on World Day Against Cyber-Censorship, Internet users throughout the world will have free and unrestricted access to Ozguruz (Turkish journalist Can Dundar’s website in Turkey), Azathabar (in Turkmenistan), Meydan (Azerbaijan), Doha News (Qatar) and Alqst (Saudi Arabia).


How does RSF outsmart censorship?


Operation #CollateralFreedom circumvents technological censorship by means of an original strategy in which “mirrors” or duplicates of the censored websites are created on the servers of the world’s Internet giants. Authoritarian regimes cannot block access to the mirrors without the “collateral damage” of restricting their own access to the services of these Internet companies.

Help us to outsmart censorship!
RSF has to buy bandwidth to keep its mirror sites accessible. The more they are visited, the faster this bandwidth is used up. By making a donation, every Internet user can help to fund the bandwidth needed to maintain and extend access to the unblocked websites. New: RSF is offering a Google Chrome and Firefox browser extension called “Censorship detector” that facilitates access to websites within the countries where they are censored.

15 countries enemies of Internet

Focus on Censorship

Vietnam

Vietnam’s government tolerates no online political debate and relentlessly gags bloggers and cyber-dissidents who dare to question its legitimacy or policies. Its determination to control online content is reflected not only in its censorship of blogs and social networks but also in its surveillance of citizen-journalists and its judicial harassment of them and their families. Firewalls block independent news sites and blogs, and site owners are often subjected to arrest or a great deal of harassment if content strays from the Communist Party line. Most Internet companies and service providers are state-owned and provide the first level of Internet surveillance, using domain name blocking to silence errant sites. Passwords are often hacked and connections are slowed on days when dissidents are arrested or tried. Mobile Internet browsing is also closely monitored as the state controls the three main operators.

175
in the 2017 World Press Freedom Index
Go to the ranking
Unblocked websites by RSF